Cover of: socratic paradox and its enemies | Roslyn Weiss

socratic paradox and its enemies

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University of Chicago Press , Chicago
Socrates, Plato, Ethics, Intentionality (Philosophy), Philosophy, An
StatementRoslyn Weiss.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsB317 .W45 2006
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3405409M
ISBN 100226891720
LC Control Number2005020954

In The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies, Roslyn Weiss argues that the Socratic paradoxes—no one does wrong willingly, virtue is knowledge, and all the virtues are one—are best understood as Socrates’ way of combating sophistic views: that no one is willingly just, those who are just and temperate are ignorant fools, and only some virtues (courage and wisdom) but not others.

In The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies, Roslyn Weiss argues that the Socratic paradoxes—no one does wrong willingly, virtue is knowledge, and all the virtues are one—are best understood as Socrates’ way of combating sophistic views: that no one is willingly just, those who are just and temperate are ignorant fools, and only some virtues (courage and wisdom) but not others Cited by: The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies book.

Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. In The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies, Roslyn /5. Roslyn Weiss's The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies presents a novel and ambitious interpretation of the familiar Socratic paradoxes: that virtue is knowledge, that all the virtues are one, and that no one does wrong willingly.

According to Weiss, the common interpretation of these paradoxes are not really "Socratic" in the sense that Socrates himself holds those views. In The Socratic paradox and its enemies book Paradox and Its Enemies, Roslyn Weiss challenges this view, arguing that the paradoxes are best seen as Socrates\' response to the pernicious views socratic paradox and its enemies book some of his contemporaries - that is, to the sophistic beliefs that no one is willingly just, that those who are just and temperate are fools, and that only some virtues (courage.

Print book: EnglishView all editions and formats Summary: Argues that the Socratic paradoxes are best understood as Socrates' way of combating sophistic views: that no one is willingly just, those who are just and temperate are ignorant fools, and only some virtues (courage and wisdom) but not others (justice, temperance, and piety) are marks.

"I know that I know nothing" is a saying derived from Plato's account of the Greek philosopher is also called the Socratic phrase is not one that Socrates himself is ever recorded as saying. This saying is also connected or conflated with the answer to a question Socrates (according to Xenophon) or Chaerephon (according to Plato) is said to have posed to.

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In "The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies", Roslyn Weiss argues that the Socratic paradoxes - no one does wrong willingly, virtue is knowledge, and all the virtues are one - are best understood as Socrates' way of combating sophistic views: that no one is willingly just, those who are just and temperate are ignorant fools, and only some virtues (courage and wisdom) but not /5(3).

About the author Socrates's best known student was Plato ( BCE), a young aristocrat. In point of fact, Plato's given name was Aristocles, but he came to be known by the nickname "Plato" which designated his broad shoulders.

Upon. "I know that I know nothing" is the Socratic Paradox. Socrates claims that he knows nothing - but how could he even know the statement itself that he knows nothing. This paradox can be easily resolved by editing the sentence: “I know that I know n. Table of contents for The socratic paradox and its enemies / Roslyn Weiss.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Roslyn Weiss, The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies.

Chicago: University of Chicago Press,Pp. ISBN $ The Socratic Paradox and its Enemies – Roslyn Weiss Article in The Philosophical Quarterly 59() - December with 17 Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Paula Gottlieb.

The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies by Roslyn Weiss BY Paul J. Diduch quantity Add to cart SKU: The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies by Roslyn Weiss BY Paul J. Diduch Category: Book Review Tag: Volume 35 Issue 3. The Socratic Paradox and its Enemies. xii + Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, Cased, So much for the thrust of W.’s book, which one may gather from Chapters 1 and 8, nature and to describe its importance to Socratic imperatives to philosophise.

Socratic Paradox This paradox, as per the wiki article, is contained in the pithy expression. The abstract conveys the gist of the idea, although it is obviously elaborated at great length in the book. The same author also wrote the article on Ancient Scepticism in the SEP, and is an expert in these subjects.

In her review of my book, The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies, Rachel Singpurwalla appeals to Xenophon to support the alleged Socratic denial of is to this aspect of her review that I wish to respond, since I have noticed that other scholars as well look to Xenophon for confirmation that the historical Socrates rejected the possibility of acting against one’s belief.

Socrates (/ ˈ s ɒ k r ə t iː z /; Ancient Greek: Σωκρᾰ́της, romanized: Sōkrátēs, [sɔːkrátɛːs]; c. – BC) was a classical Greek philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, and as being the first moral philosopher of the Western ethical tradition of thought.

An enigmatic figure, he made no writings, and is known chiefly through the accounts Born: c. BC, Deme Alopece, Athens. The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies About the Author She is the author of Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato’s ‘Crito’ and Virtue in the Cave: Moral Inquiry in Plato’s ‘Meno’.

BOOK REVIEWS The Socratic Paradox and its Enemies. By Roslyn Weiss. (Chicago UP, Pp. xii + Price £) According to what Roslyn Weiss dubs 'the standard view* of Socrates, Socrates believes that virtue is knowledge, that human beings pursue their own happiness, and that virtue is the only way to achieve it.

called the "Socratic paradox" as responses to the challenges offered by various interlocutors, "enemies" who flaunt the cleverness of injustice (see, e.g., Roslyn Weiss, The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies [Chicago University Press, ], 9, 67).

As a rhetorical weapon in Socrates's war against immor. Paradoxes are generally used to generate propositions that can be used to refute some claim that the presenting interlocutor does not believe is true.

Socrates’ paradox results from his claim about his lack of knowledge: I know that I do not know. The "Real" Socratic Paradox. Mitchell.

Details socratic paradox and its enemies PDF

What many philosophers call "the Socratic Paradox" is Socrates' view that no one intentionally does evil. It is called a "paradox" because it seems so counter-intuitive, yet Socrates had a reputation for being wise.

There are several "solutions". The one offered by Plato is that when one does. Few, if any, essays on the philosophy of Socrates have had a greater influence on contemporary scholarship than has Gerasimos Santas’ “The Socratic Paradoxes.”1 Prior to the publication of.

The Open Society and Its Enemies is a work on political philosophy by the philosopher Karl Popper, in which the author presents a "defence of the open society against its enemies", and offers a critique of theories of teleological historicism, according to which history unfolds inexorably according to universal indicts Plato, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Author: Karl Popper.

The phrase Socratic paradox can refer to two separate things. The more common usage refers to an object or idea whose very existence, or acknowledgment, is a paradox. Its name is derived from a quote of Socrates from the Republic, where he says, "I. The Socratic Paradox and its Enemies, Roslyn Weiss (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, ).

Scripta Classica Israelica 28 (). BOOK REVIEWS: Roslyn Weiss, The Socratic Paradox and its Enemies (by Jacob Howland) Michael Gagarin, Writing Greek Law (by Luca Guido) Part I.

Grammar and Exercises. Part II. The World of Athens, An Introduction to Classical Athenian Culture (by Yitzhak Dana) John N. Adams.

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The Regional Diversification of Latin BC-AD Karl Popper treats the Socratic problem in his first book of The Open Society and Its Enemies (). The German classical scholar Friedrich Schleiermacher made an attempt to solve the "Socratic problem". Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas D. Smith defend the study of Socrates' philosophy and offer an alternative interpretation of Socratic moral psychology.

Their novel account of Socrates' conception of virtue and how it is acquired shows that Socratic moral psychology is considerably more sophisticated than scholars have by:.

Written in political exile in New Zealand during the Second World War and published in two volumes inThe Open Society and its Enemies was hailed by Bertrand Russell as a 'vigorous and profound defence of democracy'. This legendary attack on the philosophies of Plato, Hegel and Marx prophesied the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe and exposed the /5(94).The Socratic Paradox and its Enemies (Review).

[REVIEW] Maureen Eckert - - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. details This is an important book.Socrates (Sōkrátēs, c.

– BC) [3] [4] was a classical Greek (Athenian) philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, and as being the first moral philosopher [5] [6] of the Western ethical tradition of thought.

[7] [8] [9] An enigmatic figure, he made no writings, and is known chiefly through the accounts of classical writers writing after his lifetime.